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Journalist looking to interview a non-binary person in non-urban area

neutrois:

Last week I had a lovely conversation with a journalist from the Washington Post who is looking to interview non-binary identified people in non-urban areas in the US. It sounds like she’s doing lots of research beforehand and taking a personalized approach.

If you’re interested, please get in touch. 

Details below:

I’m interested in doing a story about people who do not identify as male or female – who prefer gender neutral pronouns and physical presentations. My hope is to be able to give an honest, accurate representation of what it’s like, in 2014, to be a gender neutral person in a world that is still set up for binary genders. I’m interested in people who do not live in urban areas like New York or San Francisco, and are not necessarily visible activists.

I’m interested in ordinary people living their lives in more rural parts of the country, who are willing to let me spend time with them. I want to be sensitive to privacy issues, and am willing to be open to discussions of anonymity or omitting identifying details from my reporting.

My email address is hessem@washpost.com. It might be easiest for people who are interested to email first and tell me a little bit about themselves, and we can go from there.

Sincerely, 

Monica

1,879 notes

beranyth:

jeriorlizisthinking:

theacemachine:

thingsthatmakeyouacey:

It…kind of is.
For now, I’m using the term PoC (people of color) as a shorthand, understanding that it refers to people in white-majority cultures and can’t describe white-minority cultures, for ease of writing, but also because I will largely discuss diaspora.
First, let’s discuss the issue of terminology and identity. “Asexual” is a difficult term for PoC to use. We are made hypersexual (e.g. stereotypes of Black women as very sexual) and asexual (e.g. Asian men being treated as alien, sexually dysfunctional; the Mammy trope). The term “asexual” is often actually used in these contexts. Even when it isn’t, to attach “asexual” to our identity means navigating a really complex, terrible issue where PoC bodies are regulated and controlled because of racist views of our “asexuality.” Sterilization programs that target minority women are realities in the US and other nations with racial minorities, while the simultaneous “aging up” of Black children and assumed asexuality means they are treated as sexually passive, and so often are targeted in sexual crimes. This sort of “de-sexing” has been a form to control PoC/especially Black women’s agency since slavery.
Siggy writes (1): 
…



A long read but DEFINITELY worth it—and a must read for white aces (bookmark it if you have to).  I wish I could reblog all of the ensuing conversations but just recommend checking out thingsthatmakeyouacey's blog to read up on them (who is definitely worth following anyway so)
The fact there are so many white aces jumping all over this post insisting that asexuality is never a race issue just goes to show how severe a problem this is and how bad the ace community at large is at listening to the voices and experiences of ace PoC.
It’s long past time to talk less about our own experiences as universal for all aces (something I know I’ve been guilty of) and talk more about our own privilege as white aces, how to dismantle it, and how to prioritize the struggles and needs of PoC aces.  It’s a long road for sure and there’s a lot to unlearn, but this is something we can’t afford to be complacent about.

beranyth:

jeriorlizisthinking:

theacemachine:

thingsthatmakeyouacey:

It…kind of is.

For now, I’m using the term PoC (people of color) as a shorthand, understanding that it refers to people in white-majority cultures and can’t describe white-minority cultures, for ease of writing, but also because I will largely discuss diaspora.

First, let’s discuss the issue of terminology and identity. “Asexual” is a difficult term for PoC to use. We are made hypersexual (e.g. stereotypes of Black women as very sexual) and asexual (e.g. Asian men being treated as alien, sexually dysfunctional; the Mammy trope). The term “asexual” is often actually used in these contexts. Even when it isn’t, to attach “asexual” to our identity means navigating a really complex, terrible issue where PoC bodies are regulated and controlled because of racist views of our “asexuality.” Sterilization programs that target minority women are realities in the US and other nations with racial minorities, while the simultaneous “aging up” of Black children and assumed asexuality means they are treated as sexually passive, and so often are targeted in sexual crimes. This sort of “de-sexing” has been a form to control PoC/especially Black women’s agency since slavery.

Siggy writes (1): 

A long read but DEFINITELY worth it—and a must read for white aces (bookmark it if you have to).  I wish I could reblog all of the ensuing conversations but just recommend checking out thingsthatmakeyouacey's blog to read up on them (who is definitely worth following anyway so)

The fact there are so many white aces jumping all over this post insisting that asexuality is never a race issue just goes to show how severe a problem this is and how bad the ace community at large is at listening to the voices and experiences of ace PoC.

It’s long past time to talk less about our own experiences as universal for all aces (something I know I’ve been guilty of) and talk more about our own privilege as white aces, how to dismantle it, and how to prioritize the struggles and needs of PoC aces.  It’s a long road for sure and there’s a lot to unlearn, but this is something we can’t afford to be complacent about.

(via queerascat)

Filed under ace to read queue continuum